. Surah 100 Al-'Adiyat
. In The Name of Allah, the Compassion, the Compassionate
           
Vehicles of Aggression

(1) Like heaving horses rushing aggressively into battle

(2) sparks flying out of their hoofs

(3) as they rush to assault at day break

(4) making pools of blood in the rising clouds of dust

(5) and making the event central to the gathering

(6) what a sight it is showing that man can hardly appreciate the favors of His Lord to him

(7) and his aggression is his own witness to this ungratefulness

(8) For he loves nothing more than the accumulation of wealth.

(9) Does he not know what will happen if all that is buried comes to light

(10) as souls come out of chests and all that is hidden is bared

(11) it will then be clear that the Lord God of men and women has always known what they really were.
 

Commentary

    As early as it was revealed, this Surah shows how early Islam showed its abhorrence of war and aggression and its love for peace. The revelation of this Surah right after Surah No. 103 about the effect of time on man’s regression by diminishing returns except believers who grow and mature by their good use of time, may reveal connection by contrast between the themes of the two Surahs. It is shown here almost graphically how man diminishes by the application of his aggressive instincts.

    Conventional explanation by almost all Islamic commentators went so wrong as to give the apposite meaning to the first five verses by assuming that the charges mentioned (Al-`Adiyat) symbolize here the believers fight in God’s cause. This is definitely wrong as is deduced from the epithet given to horses as “Adiyat” symbolize the erring of the human soul or self-a soul devoid of all spiritual direction, obsessed and ridden by all manners of wrong, selfish desires, madly, unseeingly rushing onwards, unchecked by conscience or reason, blinded by the dust-clouds of confused and confusing appetites, storming into insoluble situations and thus into its own spiritual destruction.


.. .Ibrahim AbuNab (1931-1991)